Computation records with PiFast

Pi records on a home computer

Pi size record : 25,000,000,000 digits

The size world record for p computation on a home computer was obtained with a beta version of PiFast 4.4 : 25,000,000,000 decimal digits by Shigeru Kondo (Pentium 4 3.2Ghz, 2 Go of physical memory, in 17 days and 14 hours finished on March 7 2003) using Chudnovsky formula. The disk space needed was 100 Go. The verification was done with the same program, using Fabrice Bellard formula which checks values of consecutive bits of pi at a given position, in 36 hours on the same machine. (Note : the pi size record on a super computer is 1.2 ×1012 digits, obtained by Kanada and his team in december 2002.)
Pi = 3.
1415926535 8979323846 2643383279 5028841971 6939937510 : 50
5820974944 5923078164 0628620899 8628034825 3421170679 : 100
...
2448547079 5329693979 7145627081 9204187454 9483487803 : 24999999950
1309759846 5364560010 7388984278 8403481193 9913806533 : 25000000000
The size record computation on a 128Mo machine is 1,610,612,736 decimal digits by Colin Martin (PiFast32, Athlon 650, 128 Mo on Mar 23 2000 in 126 hours).

Pi time record for the one billion computation : 3 hours 48 minutes

The time record for p computation on a home computer for the one billion (1,000,000,000) decimal digits was obtained by Vincent Martin (France) with pifast version 4.3, in 13646 seconds ( 3 hours 48 minutes). The machine used a Pentium 4 (overclocked) at 3.680 Ghz, with 2 Go of physical memory. PiFast was used with mode #1.
History of time records of the 1,000,000,000 pi computation:
Who Time Date Machine (processor, memory) PiFast Version
Vincent Martin (France) 13646 s. Aug 2003 P4 3.680Ghz (2048 Mo) 4.3
Yann Rossé (Swiss) 14940 s. Jul 2003 P4 3.863Ghz (2048 Mo) 4.2
Shigeru Kondo (Japan) 15905 s. Feb 2003 P4 3.4Ghz (2048 Mo) 4.2

Records on the number e

E size record : 50,100,000,000 digits

The world record computation on the number e has been broken by Shigeru Kondo (the home computer record is the world record). Shigeru Kondo used a beta version of PiFast44 and computed 50,100,000,000 decimal digits. The computation, ended on September 04 2003, was done in 11 days and 1 hour on a Pentium 4 3.2Ghz, 2 Go of physical memory. 167 GB of disk space was needed. The formula used was e=1/n!. The verification achieved on September 18th 2003, was done with the formula e=1/(-1)n/n! and took 13 days and 12 hours on a Pentium 4 2.4Ghz.
E = 2.
7182818284 5904523536 0287471352 6624977572 4709369995 : 50
9574966967 6277240766 3035354759 4571382178 5251664274 : 100
...
3669726475 3295447928 1112551954 8580374319 9274714928 : 59099999950
7669321295 9798814638 4413740697 0275589771 4986918393 : 50100000000
The world record e computation on a 128 Mo. machine has been broken by
Colin Martin, who computed 3,221,225,472 digits. The computation, ended on July 13 2000, took 77 hours on an Athlon 650. 12 GB of disk space was needed. The verification took 80 hours on the same machine. This is a remarquable feat considering the size of the physical memory : 128 Mo. could contain at most 300 million digits if they were compressed !
The impressive Colin Martin record was the world record e computation at that time.

E time record for the one billion computation : 1.5 hours

The time record for e computation on a home computer for the one billion (1,000,000,000) decimal digits was obtained by Shigeru Kondou on January 2003, by running PiFast version 4.2, in 5504 seconds (  1.5 hours). The machine used a Pentium 4 running at 3.4 Ghz, with 2 Go of physical memory. PiFast was used with mode #1 (mode #2 took 6427 seconds).

Back to Numbers, constants and computation



File translated from TEX by TTH, version 3.40.
On 14 Oct 2003, 07:15.